Pulborough Brooks 4 September 2021

Sixteen members met a cool and overcast morning.  It was initially quiet birdwise around the visitors centre and the zig zag path.  The new feeding station provided some interest with Blue Tit, Great Tit, Robin, Dunnock, Greenfinch and Nuthatch.  In Fattengates Courtyard a Blackcap was seen along with Chiffchaffs calling while a small flock of Long-tailed Tits flew over.

Making our way around to West Mead Hide we disturbed a Redshank from one of the new ponds and it flew around making its distinctive alarm call.  Two Green Woodpeckers were displaying to each other on a fence post, which was interesting to watch.

Once in West Mead hide we were entertained by a couple of Snipe out in the open and around six Winchats in all actively flying around foraging.  A couple of Greenshank appeared and there were quite a few Teal and some Mallard on the water.  A Marsh Harrier took to the air as did a couple of Grey Heron.  Moving to Winpenny Hide we saw a Green Sandpiper and had some closer views of a Greenshank.  A couple of Chiffchaffs and a Whitethroat showed well close by in some blackberry bushes and a distant Wheatear was seen.

We saw a Great Spotted Woodpecker and some Goldfinches as we walked further round the trail.  Moving round to Little Hanger and Nettley’s Hides and the viewpoints, the group had good views of Black Tailed Godwits, Avocets, Lapwings, Teal, Mallard, and Greylag and Canada geese out on the Brooks.  At times small numbers of Swallows and House Martins were in the air.  Kestrel were seen hovering from time to time and three Buzzards were evident, two perched on fence posts and one circling around high up in the air. Treecreepers and Goldcrests were spotted in the woodland.

On the return two Stoats were seen on the path by some of the group.  The sun had finally come out and there were more butterflies out on the wing.  By the end of the walk a total of fifty species of birds had been counted.

Pulborough Brooks 24 April 2021

The morning walk in separate groups took place in Spring sun that really enhanced the view from the visitor centre over the lovely Arun valley. The first sighting from that point was a real surprise, a fieldfare that had not realised that it had overstayed its welcome. At the top of the zigzag path came the unmistakeable notes of the first nightingale of the day though it remained well concealed. In the courtyard two more males were having a singing duel that began we were told at dawn and then one of them perched close to us in the open. With the sun behind making its tail seem ablaze the view was stunning. At the Hangar there was an unusually good variety of waders on the brooks. There we saw a spotted redshank, several redshanks and black-tailed godwits and four each of dunlins and little ringed plovers on the muddy edges. Most pleasing were two avocets giving rise to the hope that they would follow their first ever breeding success on the reserve last year. Over the water a few sand martins hawked for insects. The trees and brambles around the viewpoint were alive with birdsong especially from warblers, blackcap and chiffchaffs were prominent with an occasional common whitethroat putting in an appearance. A few members picked up phrases from a lesser whitethroat while along the path a garden warbler was in full voice. Other passerine sightings included a treecreeper, linnets, skylarks, a goldcrest and back at the visitors centre a wheatear. Finally reports filtered through that a great white egret was showing back at the Hangar seen by a couple of members who had lingered there. It was a thoroughly enjoyable morning with 63 species identified including no less than five nightingales.The morning walk in separate groups took place in Spring sun that really enhanced the view from the visitor centre over the lovely Arun valley. The first sighting from that point was a real surprise, a fieldfare that had not realised that it had overstayed its welcome. At the top of the zigzag path came the unmistakeable notes of the first nightingale of the day though it remained well concealed. In the courtyard two more males were having a singing duel that began we were told at dawn and then one of them perched close to us in the open. With the sun behind making its tail seem ablaze the view was stunning. At the Hangar there was an unusually good variety of waders on the brooks. There we saw a spotted redshank, several redshanks and black-tailed godwits and four each of dunlins and little ringed plovers on the muddy edges. Most pleasing were two avocets giving rise to the hope that they would follow their first ever breeding success on the reserve last year. Over the water a few sand martins hawked for insects. The trees and brambles around the viewpoint were alive with birdsong especially from warblers, blackcap and chiffchaffs were prominent with an occasional common whitethroat putting in an appearance. A few members picked up phrases from a lesser whitethroat while along the path a garden warbler was in full voice. Other passerine sightings included a treecreeper, linnets, skylarks, a goldcrest and back at the visitors centre a wheatear. Finally reports filtered through that a great white egret was showing back at the Hangar seen by a couple of members who had lingered there. It was a thoroughly enjoyable morning with 63 species identified including no less than five nightingales.The morning walk in separate groups took place in Spring sun that really enhanced the view from the visitor centre over the lovely Arun valley. The first sighting from that point was a real surprise, a fieldfare that had not realised that it had overstayed its welcome. At the top of the zigzag path came the unmistakeable notes of the first nightingale of the day though it remained well concealed. In the courtyard two more males were having a singing duel that began we were told at dawn and then one of them perched close to us in the open. With the sun behind making its tail seem ablaze the view was stunning. At the Hangar there was an unusually good variety of waders on the brooks. There we saw a spotted redshank, several redshanks and black-tailed godwits and four each of dunlins and little ringed plovers on the muddy edges. Most pleasing were two avocets giving rise to the hope that they would follow their first ever breeding success on the reserve last year. Over the water a few sand martins hawked for insects. The trees and brambles around the viewpoint were alive with birdsong especially from warblers, blackcap and chiffchaffs were prominent with an occasional common whitethroat putting in an appearance. A few members picked up phrases from a lesser whitethroat while along the path a garden warbler was in full voice. Other passerine sightings included a treecreeper, linnets, skylarks, a goldcrest and back at the visitors centre a wheatear. Finally reports filtered through that a great white egret was showing back at the Hangar seen by a couple of members who had lingered there. It was a thoroughly enjoyable morning with 63 species identified including no less than five nightingales.